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動態 (8)
Eyin Thor
2017年05月23日
Eyin Thor
Before you start to remove weeds from your garden again– READ THIS POST! Learn about the edible weeds that are healthy and taste great. In the spring and summer, or whenever the favorable weather arrives, the sun and the warmth bring the irresistible desire to grow plants and beautiful flowers. We love to see their dazzling colors that cover up the green meadows and love to look again and again– how they shine under the sun in the garden. But with all of these, comes the unexpected surprises, a few unwanted plants “the weeds”. But do you know that many tasty and healthy edible plants can be found among the common weeds? Wild edible weeds can turn an ordinary dish into an exquisite dish. They also have many medicinal properties. Some of these weeds are low in calories, contain a lot of vitamins, minerals, trace elements, protein, and fiber. Which parts of edible weeds are the best to eat? The nutritional value of the plants depends on the vegetation period, so you should find out what is the best time to begin harvesting. For some weeds, flowers are harvested when they are still in buds and for others, the best time is immediately after development. Depending on the species, you can cut the whole inflorescence, pluck individual flowers or just tear the petals. Leaves are tastiest and healthiest when they are young and tender although they are not suitable for long-term storage. Roots should be harvested when the plant is dormant, in the spring or autumn. 1. Wild Amaranth
Also known as “Pigweed”, amaranth leaves are treated as a green leafy vegetable like spinach. The seeds of wild amaranth are edible too and can be roasted. They are a good source of free protein. The young leaves of pigweed are soft and mild in taste and can also be used in salads  or teas and the older leaves can be cooked like spinach. It contains proteins, vitamin A and C and minerals. This plant can be toxic to livestock animals due to the presence of nitrates in the leaves.2. Queen Anne’s Lace
The wild carrot is almost identical to the highly poisonous hemlock. So be very careful that you don’t confuse. There are many ways to identify wild carrot, but one important identifier of wild carrot is the smell, it smells like a carrot. Like carrots, its roots are also edible when young (first year) but can become woody if not harvested on time. Its flower heads are edible too and can be eaten raw or cooked. 3. Lamb’s Quarters
Lamb’s quarter leaves tend to look dusty and have a white powdery coating on them. This edible weed is packed with nutrition. Its tender leaves are great in salads and can be used as a substitute for other leafy vegetables. Its flowers and seeds are also edible that tastes like quinoa. However, its seeds contain toxic called Saponins in meager amount and should not be consumed in excess. Lamb’s quarters contain some oxalic acid therefore when eating this raw, small quantities are recommended. However, its seeds contain toxic called Saponins in meager amount and should not be consumed in excess. This plant can be toxic to livestock animals due to the presence of nitrates in the leaves.4. Comfrey
Comfrey is a member of the borage family. Although not very aromatic, this herb is known for it medicinal properties and high protein content. Comfrey roots and leaves are also used to treat wounds because they contain allantoin, a substance that helps new skin cells grow to heal the wound quickly. For cooking, only use young leaves as older leaves grow hard hairs. Apart from that, comfrey can also be used as a garden fertilizer and as mulch. 5. Winter Cress
The Winter Cress is available at the time in winter when most the plants don’t even grow. It belongs to the mustard family and considered as a weed. However, it is a rich source of Vitamin C. The leaves are bitter but best in taste before the plant starts to flower while they are still young and tender. At this stage, they can be added to salads like rocket. It can also be used as a vegetable like spinach. 6. Common Mallow
Common mallow (Malva sylvestris) has many medicinal and edible uses and can be easy found growing wild in most places. All parts of this plant are edible. The leaves, flowers, fruits and seeds can be eaten, whether raw in salads or cooked and like many other leafy greens, usually more tender and tasty when they are smaller and less mature. More mature leaves can be cooked. It has a very mild flavor, although the plant is quite rich in vitamins A, B, and C, along with calcium, magnesium, and potassium. 7. Purslane
Also called “Pussley”, the common Purslane (Portulaca oleracea) is a healthy edible weed from the moss rose family. You might be surprised but in China and India and in many other countries it is cultivated popularly. Also, this nutritious succulent has more omega-3 fatty acids than any other leafy edible plant according to researchers at the University of Texas at San Antonio. It can be a great addition to a salad, soups or stews. It has a crunchy texture and leaves and stems can be eaten raw or cooked to add a spicy flavor to any dish. 8. Chickweed
Chickweed grows in a unique, intertwined manner, and it has small white star-shaped flowers. The stems have a thin line of white hair that grows in a weave-like pattern. Chickweed’s stems, leaves, and flowers are all edible. This delicious weed has a mild, refreshing flavor. The leaves and stems can be added to salads like lettuces or cooked as greens. It is loaded with nutritious elements and has many medicinal uses too. Chickweed’s stems, leaves, and flowers are all edible. This delicious weed has a mild, refreshing flavor. The leaves and stems can be added to salads like lettuces or cooked as greens. It is loaded with nutritious elements and has many medicinal uses too. 9. Plantain
The plantain is found in meadows, pastures, roadsides or in neglected sites. The herbaceous plant is up to 50 centimeters high, the narrow leaves are up to 25 centimeters long. It erupts a mushroom-like aroma. Plantain can be used in a preparation of soups, salads or as a vegetable. The juice of crushed leaves helps against itching. 10. Nettle
The stinging nettle is one of the most easily identifiable weed and invasive too. But do you know it is highly regarded for its protein content? It has the 16 free amino acids. Nettle is also rich in vitamin A and C, iron, magnesium, calcium and antioxidants. The young leaves are cooked. Its soup is also popular in many countries. However, when dealing with nettle, make sure you wear gloves as its hairs can cause skin irritation or dermatitis. 11. Dandelion
Dandelion has a very bad reputation as a weed, especially among those who like to keep a clean and green lawn. However, this plant is pollinator’s favorite and also this plant is edible, from the roots to the flowers. The dandelion leaves can be harvested too at any time in the growing season. 12. Common Burdock
This biennial weed is very common along the ditches but also in the mountains at low altitude. The first-year roots and second-year stems can be cooked by boiling for about 20 minutes, then season to taste. Before cooking, the stems must be peeled and roots scrubbed in order to remove the bitter rind. Immature flower stalks may also be harvested in late spring before flowers appear; their taste is similar to that of artichoke. The Japanese have been known to eat the leaves when a plant is young and leaves are soft. 13. Clover
Beyond occasional hunting, this common herb goes unnoticed on the lawn but it is very important for bees and bumblebees. The flowers and leaves of clover can be used to add variety to meals. A few raw clover leaves can be chopped in salads or sauteed and added to dishes for a green accent; and flowers, whether red or white, can be eaten raw or cooked, including dried for tea. The refreshing acid flavor spices salads or vegetables. Also Read: How to Grow Clover 14. Watercress
Watercress is rich in minerals, beta-carotene, and vitamin C. It is rich in nutrients. This perennial plant has hollow stems and small heart-shaped leaves. The peppery flavor of watercress is sharp but not bitter. This water-loving plant can be found growing near creeks and ponds or nearby to other waterbodies. There are many delicious watercress recipes you can easily find on the web. 15. Shepherd’s purse
This plant is related to mustard family, it looks like dandelion and tastes like rocket.: The other distinguishable feature of Shepherd’s purse is that it is up to 50 centimeters high and have white flowers. You can find this plant on sunny, nitrogen-rich clay, sand or gravel soils. The taste is somewhat reminiscent of rocket and its leaves can be eaten raw or cooked. The leaves are a watercress and cabbage substitute and become peppery with age. The flowering shoots can be eaten as well. 16. Water Spinach
In most tropical parts it is considered as a weed. This semi-aquatic plant is a creeper that grows in or near the water on moist soils and has light green ovate leaves, its stems are hollow, so they can float on the water. Both the leaves and stems are edible and can be used as the way you use spinach. Under tropical conditions, water spinach can be harvested throughout the year, as the leaves grow again after harvesting. In cooler climates it is grown as annual, mostly in wide containers. Also Read: How to Grow Water Spinach in Containers Finally a Tip! If you have doubts on the recognition of a certain plant– “Please Avoid Eating It” until you are sure which plant it is. You can ask your gardener friends for the help or download one of these plant recognition apps.
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Eyin Thor
2017年05月23日
Eyin Thor
Turmeric is a superfood and it has myriads of health benefits but do you know it can be used in your garden, too. Read on to learn about these turmeric uses!
Turmeric is one of the must used ingredients in South Asian cuisines, used to color the curries: For the exotic taste and mild flavor. It has many medicinal properties and used popularly in alternative medicines. Also Read: How to Grow Turmeric In Pots This super food is packed with antioxidants and antiseptic properties and also has compounds that help fight cancer, promote brain health, and improve digestion and even more. But did you ever thought that TURMERIC can be useful in the garden? See these turmeric uses to find out! 1. Pesticide
Turmeric is a super food for us but ants and other pests abhor it to the core and avoid totter around it. To repel pests, especially the ants– simply sprinkle turmeric powder around the base of the plant and on leaves or anywhere near the ant traces. Must remember, when using organic products, persistency is the key. 2. Heal wounds
If you ever got hurt and it’s bleeding you can place a thick paste made of turmeric powder and water over there. Same for plants, got a wound on a tree or shrub due to pruning, use turmeric. Either apply a thick paste or sprinkle turmeric powder on the wound for a natural and safe healing. The turmeric powder will prevent any bacterial or fungicidal disease. It also helps accelerate the plant’s natural healing process. 3. Get rid of Powdery Mildew
If your plants are suffering from powdery mildew, turmeric will help them. Mix one part turmeric and two part wood ash. Sprinkle this powder on infected plants on a non-windy day. It is recommended to sprinkle this early in the morning because the dew on the leaves will adhere the powder. Also Read: Ways to Use Wood Ash in the Garden 4. Treat Bug Bites
Organic is best! Got bitten by a bug when working in the garden? Add some water to 2 teaspoon turmeric powder and apply it directly to the bite. Turmeric gets absorbed into the skin quickly and reduces the itchiness and cures the inflammation.
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Eyin Thor
2017年05月23日
Eyin Thor
Do you kill your plants often? Well here’re 13 things you must avoid to make your container plants keep growing.
1. Overwatering Many new gardener believes that the more they water the better. All plants (including non-potted plants) have the different watering needs and *those needs may also vary depending upon the time of the year or season, the amount of light and ambient temperature. The easiest solution to avoid this problem is knowing the moisture level required by each plant. The majority of plants (except moisture loving plants) loves when the top surface of the substrate dries out between the watering spells, others require the soil to be kept slightly moist. A good method is to usually poke your finger into the soil about an inch deep and feel if it is wet or rather dry. 2. Underwatering It is equally harmful to the plants. Back to the same point, it is essential to know the moisture requirements of each plant to keep them healthy. Also, it is obvious, in summer all the plants require more water and you should double the amount of water. When you water your plants, do it thoroughly, so that the entire substrate moisten well and the slight amount of water seeps out from the bottom holes of the pots and then wait for it to dry (with the method of poking your finger) and then water again. 3. You do not know everything about the plant No two plants are identical. The number one thing you should do is read the instructions that come with the plant you have acquired. Always, when you purchase plants in the nursery ask them about the growing requirements. Whenever you get a new plant search about it thoroughly on the web. There are many gardening websites (ours too) and blogs of enthusiastic gardeners who have excellent information about plants. 4. Too little or too much sunlight Yo might be wrong if you think all plants love the sun, there are some that require shade or part shade. According to experts, the plants themselves can tell us if they are getting the right amount of light or not. For example, the leaves may change color or become scorched or brownish if they are getting too much sunlight. On the other hand, if you notice that your plant is “stretching its neck” toward the light or the leaves are excessively bigger then they definitely need more light. One thing to be noted is that when the warm climate plants are grown in colder zones (whether they are grown there in full or part sun) they require full sun. Similarly, the temperate plants in warm tropics grow best in part sun or shade. 5. Moving or changing position of plants Plants get used to the place they are placed on and do not like being moved constanly. If one of your plants is thriving correctly under certain temperatures and conditions, avoid moving it to another place as it could make difficult for the plant to adapt to its new place. 6. Incorrect soil
Each plant species has different planting needs and soil requirements. It is recommended that you do proper research about the soil type before planting any plant. However, in containers, well-draining soil is used to avoid root rot. You can make your own light and crumbly soilless mix or buy an organic potting mix of good quality. 7. No transplanting Potted plants may feel “subjected” to their containers. The majority of them outgrow their pots over a period of about one to two years (depending on how quickly they grow), so it is important that you transplant them into a larger container with fresh and well-nourished potting soil. You can prune the roots of your plants if you don’t want to change their existing pot. One of the signs to know when to transplant is when the leaves turn yellow, the plant stops growing or seems thirsty and requires water again and again. Even in some cases, you can see that the roots are coming out from the drainage holes. 8. Ignoring the pests Some of the most common pests that can affect your potted plants are aphids, spider mites, scales, whiteflies and mealybugs. You can prevent pests from attacking your container garden with some techniques. Whenever you buy a new plant scrutinize it to see any sign of pests or diseases. Keep an eye on diseased or weak plants or the ones that are in stress; pests prefer to attack such plants. Look at the inside of leaves and tips of the plants, these are the parts that pests infest most. If pests are already damaging your plants, first identify what type of pests they are and then treat them appropriately, prefer organic pesticides. 9. Carelessness Are you going on a vacation? It is good for you but not for your potted plants. Be sure to make arrangements for them. Ask someone to come and water the plants when you are away. Another option is to use self-watering containers, they are great especially if you’re a busy person and often forget about watering your plants. 10. Less or no fertilizer Potted plants depend on soil nutrients and can often require supplements to grow better and healthy besides improving the production of flowers and fruits. Using a balanced fertilizer (easily available) regularly and according to the package instructions, you can ensure that your plants are getting all the nutrients they need. While most of your plants do well with balanced fertilizer, there may be some that require specific combination of nutrients. 11. Overfertilization Overfertilization can also harm your plants. It can even kill them. Fertilizers when used in excess can damage the roots. If you see the symptoms like yellowing and wilting of lower leaves, browning leaf tips and its margins, defoliation, slow or no growth then it is possible that your plant is suffering from overfertilization. 12. No pinching, deadheading, and pruning
If you want bushier growth, pinch the tips of young plants. Also, many flowering plants require “deadheading”, which means picking and removing the old flowers to promote new ones. You will know when to remove them once the flowers start to fade or wilt or turn brownish. Potted plants require pruning too and on time, some of the fruits and flowering plants produce only on new branches, so if you must not ignore pruning. 13. Exposing to extreme temperatures If you research carefully about the plants you’ll find how much temperature (maximum or minimum) they tolerate best. In winters, if require, it is good if you protect such plants by keeping them indoors or in a greenhouse. If you’re living in a warm climate where summers are hot, protect your plants from the intense sun in summer.
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Eyin Thor
2017年05月23日
Eyin Thor
Growing eggplants in containers is not complicated, and if you’re a fan of grilling and oven broiling, you should grow this delicious and PRODUCTIVE vegetable. Eggplant is a perennial tropical vegetable plant native to South and East Asia (namely, China and India) and a member of the tomato family. The plant loves heat and full sun and requires evenly moist soil in its native environment to thrive and fruit heavily. These are the medium sized bushes, and nowadays a much more dwarf and compact cultivars are available for limited space gardeners. Similar to the other cousins of nightshade family e.g. tomatoes and peppers, it is possible to grow this vegetable in a container. How to Grow Eggplants in Pots
Growing eggplants in pots is possible in two ways– Either start them using seeds or buy the seedlings from a nearby nursery or garden center. If you’re new to growing plants and have not grown them much– buy a few seedlings of your favorite eggplant variety. This will make things hassle free! If you’ve decided to germinate them from seeds, then that is also relatively easy. Planting Time Usually, in the spring, it’s the season when eggplant seedlings are transplanted on the ground when all the dangers of frost are passed. BUT container grown eggplants can be planted in summer and even in early fall, if you’re ready to move the pots here and there to control the temperature, especially during the nighttime when the temperature dips down. If you’re growing eggplants in a hot and warm frost-free climate, planting in winter is also possible. Note that; this vegetable plant is more sensitive to low temperatures than tomatoes and peppers.Starting Eggplants from Seeds Ensure you plant up to two seeds in each cell of a seedling tray or directly sow two seeds in each container. Remember, the eggplants require a lot of warmth for germination, more than tomatoes and peppers. Therefore, if you think the outdoors is not warm enough (temperature above 68 F (20 C) is good enough for eggplant seeds to germinate), you can place them indoors to kick start their growth, that’s the best of container gardening. Once they have sprouted and had up to four leaves, they can be transplanted into the desired containers. Choosing a Pot You’ll need a large container, depending on the cultivar, the larger the variety you’re growing, the larger the pot! Usually, the eggplant is relatively large, similar to a pepper plant or tomato so it requires a large pot which should be big enough for the capacity of five gallons, at least. In other words, use a pot that is at least 12 inches deep in size for each plant. If growing in a cooler region, choose a pot that retains heat. Here’s an informative article on choosing the best pot type for your container garden! Requirements for Growing Eggplants in Containers
Position Place the pots in a spot which has good air circulation and gets direct sunlight and some wind. This is because the eggplant requires a lot of warmth and sun exposure when growing. West or south facing direction is appropriate. Soil The eggplants require a lot of nutrients for growth and a neutral or slightly acidic soil in pH. Use soil that is rich in nutrients, most preferably loamy soilless potting mix. Eggplants thrive in the soil which has adequate and sufficient moisture so think about the moisture retaining capability of soil too. Therefore, you should also add a lot of compost or aged manure to the soil to enhance its capacity to retain water. Watering Eggplants love to grow in evenly moist soil, ensure you provide adequate moisture for them. Make sure the drainage is good to avoid root rot. Also, take care not to saturate the soil with too much water making it soggy. Fertilizer To provide ample nutrients for more productivity, you should apply fertilizer following the recommendations on the fertilizer bag. As eggplants are heavy feeders and need the fertilizer high in phosphorous, use the 5-10-5 fertilizer or other in a similar ratio, you can apply the balanced fertilizer, too. If required, spray on the leaves of your plants with liquid plant food, typically known as the foliar feeding. Temperature Once the plants are germinated and transplanted into the pots, provide them heat and try to keep them in the temperature above 50-54 F (10-12 C). If you’re growing eggplants in a warm climate, you don’t need to worry about temperature requirements much. Eggplant Care
Pruning and Removing Suckers Growing eggplant in a pot is not different than tomatoes, however, pruning it and picking the suckers is not necessary unlike TOMATOES but to improve productivity you can do this. When the plants are mature, you’ll need to look out for suckers to remove them. Yellowing or diseased leaves or branches growing tall and lanky and hindering the growth and productivity should be removed too. Staking As eggplant bush grows tall and its fruits are plump and heavy, you’ll need to tie your plants to the stake to support them. The most simple thing you can do is to thrust a stick in the pot and tie your plant to it, you can also use a cage to help the plant from falling. Pests and Diseases The most common pests for the eggplant is the black flea beetle, which feeds on the leaves of the plant, these insects are the common sight but if the plant is healthy, they won’t do any harm and also the aphids. One more common pest is the cutworm. This worm, as its name suggests, usually cuts the plant at its base. This can be prevented by using a cutworm collar or you can easily eliminate them by yourself. These pests can also be controlled using CHEMICAL pesticides, which we don’t recommend. Eggplants grown in pots don’t get affected by diseases often. However, if you want, check out the list of eggplant diseases here! Harvesting The eggplant usually reaches maturity after two to three months after planting, to say more clearly, in 60-80 days, depending more the type of variety you’re growing and the climate. At around this time, the plant starts to produce fruits which grow to become glossy when fully mature.
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Eyin Thor
2017年05月23日
Eyin Thor
Learn how to grow poppies in this article. Even if you don’t have a space for large flower beds, by growing poppies in pots you can still enjoy the colorful blooms of this stately flowering plant.
Beautiful and seemingly delicate, the poppies are the plants not particularly very easy to grow but the beauty of the flowering plant makes it a popular classic. Those who want to enjoy the intense blooms in their container gardens must grow poppies in pots. Best Poppy Varieties There are some of the varieties of poppies that are popular and can grow well in a pot: Oriental poppy Most of the oriental poppy cultivars have large strikingly beautiful flowers that usually appears in late spring to early summer in bright colors like orange and red. There are also softer colors of this perennial flowering plant: pink, white and purple, with or without a central spot. Height: 0.40 to 1.20 m. USDA Hardiness Zones: 2-9 Iceland poppy Usually grown as an annual or biennial.This short living perennial is self-seeding and come year after year, does not like the hot summers. Lightly perfumed flowers appear from mid spring to mid summer in colors like yellow, orange, red, pink and white. Flowers of this cultivar fade slowly than other poppies. Height: 0.30 to 0.6 m. USDA Hardiness zones: 3-9 California poppy The showy state flower of California is a short-lived perennial in warm temperate and subtropical climates (USDA Zone 8-10). If you want to grow poppy in a tropical climate, try California poppy, keeping the plant in partial shade in summer. Height: 0.15 to 0.45 m. USDA Zones: 6-10b Shirley poppy One of the most beautiful and delicate poppies. Shirley Poppy is the name given to an ornamental cultivar group derived from the European wild field poppy (Papaver rhoeas). Height: up to 0.6 m USDA Zones: 3-9, can be grown in zones 10 & 11 as annual but doesn’t tolerate tropical heat well. Choosing a Pot Growing poppies in pots is easy, the plant is best grown in a medium sized pot. As poppies don’t tolerate waterlogged soil, ensure the pot has sufficient drainage holes in the bottom so that the water will drain freely. How to Grow PoppiesSowing Seeds and Planting 1. Poppy grows well from seeds. Make sure that you place the pot in a bright position after planting seeds as poppy seeds require light to germinate. Also, most of the poppies do not like being transplanted, so either choose a pot that biodegradable or plant seeds in the exact pot in which you wish to grow poppy plants later. 2. Disperse seeds by hand in the pot. As the poppy seeds are very small, gardeners often mix them with sand to achieve a more equitable distribution. This also helps to see where the seeds were sown. 3. Tamp the seeds lightly down on the soil so that they are covered by a very thin layer of soil or sand. This keeps the seeds in place and they’ll also get plenty of light for germination. Once the seeds are planted moisten the soil making sure you don’t move the seeds. 4. Keep the soil constantly moist until germination. Germination depends on the climate and species but usually occurs within 25 days. 5. Poppies have a very delicate root system in the beginning so once the seedlings sprout water them gently. Thin out the seedlings 4-6 inches apart, when they reach a height of 5 inches. If you are planting in a medium to the large sized pot you can easily keep more than one plant per pot. Requirements for Growing Poppies in Pots
Location Poppies love the sun, so place your pots in a spot that receives ample sunlight, at least 6-7 hours daily. However, if you live in a warm climate where the sun is intense, grow poppies in partial sun. Soil Poppies can thrive on a variety of soils unless it is clay rich and blocks the drainage, the best is to use humus rich, loamy potting mix. The substrate should be neither too loose, nor prone to compaction and must be well draining. Slightly acidic to neutral soil pH is recommended. Watering When the poppies are in bloom or about to bloom in warm season, watering must be moderate and regular. On the contrary, once you get past the period of flowering, best to leave the soil dry as much as possible and watering must be done only when the top one inch surface of soil seems dry. Poppy Plant Care
Fertilizer Poppies are not heavy feeders; on the ground, they tolerate poor soil and thrive on their own but when growing poppies in pots you’ll need to fertilize the plant. At the time of planting or at the beginning of growing season, usually, spring (fall in warm frost-free climates), add a slow-release fertilizer to provide a steady supply of nutrition to plant during the whole season. If you haven’t added a slow release fertilizer start to feed the plant with balanced liquid fertilizer on a bi-weekly basis once the plant has exceeded the height of 5 inches or when new growth emerges in spring. You can also feed the plant with flower fertilizer during the flowering period. Cease the application of fertilizer once the growing period ends. Also, poppies are prone to magnesium and iron deficiency, application of Epsom salt is recommended. Deadheading Cut off the faded flowers to encourage more blooms. Pests and Diseases If the pot is not well draining or if you overwater the plant, it may die due to root rot. It also suffers from powdery mildew. In pests, keep an eye on aphids and spider mites.
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Eyin Thor
2017年02月16日
Eyin Thor
If you want to have a successful and most productive VEGETABLE garden, do crop rotation. Learn everything you need to know about it in this informative guide!
What is crop rotation? Crop rotation is the practice of dedicating a single spot in the garden or patch of land to only one type or family of vegetable or crop for a certain time period. Specifically, members of one plant family must never be planted in that same spot or area more than once in a period of four years. Do you know crop rotation boosts the yield, prevent soil-borne diseases and weeds, and improves soil condition? This is done for two reasons. First, this helps prevent the spread of soil-borne diseases and pests; second, doing so allows soil nutrients to be replenished and used properly. Read on to know more about the crop rotation benefits. If you want to read more about the crop rotation benefits, head over to this educational website! 1. Disease Prevention
Garden insects and pests have a tendency of feeding on plants that are related to each other. For example, let’s say cabbage-eating insects have laid their eggs on the soil before death. If cabbage or another vegetable from the same family will be planted in that exact spot, those eggs will hatch and start feeding on the new plants, thus continuing the cycle. The same applies to soil-borne diseases like bacteria and fungi, and so by planting a different type of plant, you prevent pests and disease from re-emerging in the garden. 2. Prevent Soil Nutrient Depletion
Crop rotation can also help in preventing the depletion of soil nutrients. Crops grow when they absorb sufficient amounts of the following nutrients: phosphorus, potassium, and nitrogen. If plants from the same family are grown on the same patch of soil, expect more of those nutrients to be absorbed. As long as the same plants are raised on that section of the garden, those same nutrients will be absorbed, and eventually, they will be depleted. For this reason, it’s usually recommended that soil-builders (like beans) and light feeders (like onions) are planted once those heavy nutrient absorbers are harvested. Below are details of different plant families and what crops to plant after them.The Major Plant Families and When These Should Be PlantedOnion Family – Light feeders, must be planted after the soil enrichers or heavy absorbersCabbage Family – Heavy absorbers, should be planted after legumes. Once these have been harvested, you have three options: let the planting area be fallow for one season, plant a cover crop next, or add compost to your garden.Lettuce Family –Like the above, they are heavy nitrogen feeders. These must be followed with legumes.Beet Family – They also require lots of nutrients. Legumes must follow any member of this plant family.Grass Family – Follow these plants with any tomato family member.Bean Family –These are soil-building crops. You can plant these before or after planting any member of the other plant families.Tomato Family – Considered heavy feeders. Must be planted after grass family members. Legumes must follow these plants.Squash Family –Heavy absorbers of nutrients. These must be planted after grass family members and should be followed with legumes.Carrot Family –Light to Medium Absorbers. Plants in this category can follow members of any other plant group. You can let your garden sit for one season or you can follow these with onions or legumes. With a few patches of soil, a highly reliable water tank for rainwater storage, and the above plan, you can start growing vegetables in your own home SUCCESSFULLY. This is not just a money-saving endeavor, this is also a great way to help save the planet. Start your own vegetable garden now!
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Eyin Thor
2017年02月16日
Eyin Thor
Want to keep your plants healthy and productive? Here’re the 5 essential ways to do this. Learn more! One of the most satisfying things to do is to have a healthy and productive garden. In fact, gardening has a lot of benefits. Greenery can keep away negative vibes that ruin your mood. 1. Right soil is what you need
Obviously, you can’t have plants growing healthy and productive if you don’t have right soil. Right? It means, your soil should be fertile, permeable, loamy, and right pH. As good and healthy soil helps build up a strong, productive plant. Also, think again if you want to use chemicals for soil treatments– To have the best and desirable result, better go for organic soil. 2. Choosing the right plants is important
Just because you like a particular plant that doesn’t mean you can also have it growing successfully. You have to choose plants that not only look attractive but also match with the planting conditions you have. Choose plants that will adjust well to any spot in terms of the light, moisture, drainage, soil quality, and dimensions. Also, choose plants that are more resistant pests and diseases to ensure they will grow healthier day by day. 3. Proper spacing is must
Proper planting space is essential. No doubt it is one of the biggest factors that contributes to the health of the plants. Each plant has its own spacing needs but a few tips like providing proper air circulation around the plants or choosing a large pot (for container gardening) must be considered. Groundcovers and low growing plants should be grouped tightly in beds you don’t walk on. Grouping the plants rightly will also help in reducing the need for weeding and the wastage of water. Moreover, it leads to easier path maintenance. Of course, since plants also need air circulation, you should have ample space between them and the rows. It will also contribute to repel fungal attacks. However, if you have limited space and time, and want the highest returns of your fresh organic plants, you ought to consider planting indeterminate tomatoes, non-hybrid (old) pole beans, and Zucchini in containers. 4. Proper watering must be done
The right watering is one of the most important things you should consider. Just because you have to water the plants it doesn’t mean you’ll have to wet them. Different plants have different watering needs but there is a common approach– Never overwater or underwater your plants. Also, you should know about the right watering time– the best time to water plants is usually in the mornings, since it is the time when the day is cool and without strong winds. So the amount of water lost to evaporation is reduced. But if you water the plants in the evening, it might stay damp overnight, making them more likely to be damaged by fungal and bacterial diseases. Most experts recommend a substantial, infrequent watering for established plants. It is to ensure that the plants will grow in the right way. 5. Planting position is the key
For the best-growing plants, it is important that you care about the planting position. Choose the space with proper sunlight. However, don’t forget about the fact that are the plants too that thrive in shade. Also, the planting position must be well-draining. If you’re growing plants in containers, care about there are sufficient drainage holes in the bottom of the pots. Whether you realize it or not, gardening is an investment and it brings a significant impact in life! John has great passion in writing and he writes on various topics. His engaging photos and well-written travel experiences are such a refreshing change from the other blogs in the related field.
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Eyin Thor
2017年02月15日
Eyin Thor
To have a productive garden, healthy soil is essential and if you want to improve your garden soil here we’ve 6 Most Important Tips.6 Ways to Get Super Soil
1. Look out for the color of your garden soil A pitch-dark soil is best. As a general rule of thumb– Darker soil has more organic content as the substances resulting from decomposition of the organic matter are oxidized and acquire a dark coloration. Here’s an informative article that’ll teach you more about soil color and its effects on plants. 2. Soil texture is also important Identifying the texture of the garden soil is important too. The best garden soil is loamy in texture. It is neither too porous and nor too compact. The soil must be crumbly, airy, and light. To determine the texture, it is important that you feel it For this, take a handful of soil and drop enough water on it and form a ball. When you press it, it will fall apart quickly (if it is sandy) and you will feel the grit rub. A silt will form a ball, but when you try to roll it out into a ribbon it will crack. A clay soil will roll out into a long ribbon. However, if the texture of your soil is ideal you’ll be able to form the ball easily and when you press, it will break and fall apart gradually.
3. Notice the depth of your soil The depth of the soil is as important as the texture and color of the soil. Go to the planting site and dig it with the help of a shovel. If you can dig at least 10-12 inches down (the more the better) without touching the hard layers of earth, it would be better. It is required for the healthy growth of plants as roots penetrate deeply. If the depth of your soil is not sufficient you’ll need to make it deeper. 4. Weed out the weeds Look out for the existing vegetation at the planting site. If there are unwanted plants (which we call weeds) remove them. The population of weeds will also determine how healthy your soil is. You may need to improve the soil more if even the weeds are unable to thrive at your neglected planting site. Read these weeding tips for help.
5. Don’t avoid the soil testing For the backyard gardeners, this step is essential to follow– Not only you’ll find out whether your soil is acidic, alkaline or neutral but also the different trace elements and minerals. The test also informs you about the contamination of soil. Contact your local extension office for soil testing. Unlike many soil testing labs the extension office of your county will do this for free (or at low cost). You can also purchase a test kit that allows you to determine the soil composition. However, this may be costly and you’ll not get plenty of details. Once you find out the pH level and all the details of your soil you can easily balance it to grow your favorite plants. 6. Add Organic matter Adding the organic matter always help and you should add well-rotted manure and compost regularly as it adds nutrients to soil naturally and also provides food for microorganisms that live in the soil. The addition of organic matter also improves the texture of the soil.
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